Considering a Historic Home in Wake Forest NC? Become Familiar With a COA!

So you’ve just purchased that historic home in Wake Forest NC that you have always dreamed about or maybe you already own a historic home in Wake Forest NC – either way, a Certificate of Appropriateness (COA) is something that you should be familiar with.

What is a Certificate of Appropriateness?  A Certificate of Appropriateness is a permit that allows you physically alter exterior surfaces and areas within a Historic District.  A COA will most likely be issued when it has been determined that the proposed improvements conform with the overall historic character of the District.  You must obtain a COA PRIOR TO any work beginning.  A COA will have specific quidelines set forth to determine how the work will be done as well as set parameters to operate within.

For instance,  you want to paint your white historic home in Wake Forest NC a different color that perhaps you think will evoke a more Victorian “feel”.  Before you can do so you must apply for and receive a Certificate of Appropriateness.  Should you want to paint your home the SAME color then you would not need a COA.  (Always better to be safe though and call your local Historic Preservation Committee)

Some additional examples of what MAY not need a COA are:

  • Interior renovations or remodels that do not affect the exterior of the home.
  • Planting of shrubs, flower, trees

What is most important though are the types of work that DO need a Certificate of Appropriateness.  Here are a few examples:

  • Moving of a structure
  • Demolition of a structure
  • Conversion to handicap accessible
  • Fences, pools, tennis courts
  • ANY change to the roof line of the structure
  • any addition of an outlying building such as a shed or garage

Keep in mind that even if the scope of your future project does not entail a Building Permit you still need a Certificate of Appropriateness.

Again, for any specific questions regarding your City or Town it would be best to contact your Historic Preservation Committee.

While purchasing and owning a historic home is a wonderful achievement and a life long dream for many – it is best to remember that historic homeownership can be drastically different from that of non-historic homeownership.  Due to the delicate nature of these properties and their significant contribution to history they have to be handled with care which is why there are so many safeguards in place to ensure that they continue their legacy.

If you are currently searching for historic homes in Wake Forest NC please let me know!  There are quite a few currently listed and I would be happy to share their history with you.  You can reach me at 919.649.6128 or simply send me an email!  To discover more that Wake Forest NC has to offer you can visit:

Life in Wake Forest NC

Discover Wake Forest NC

Wake Forest House Chick

 

House Passes FULL Funding for the Historic Preservation Fund

From Preservation Nation……

On July 30, the House passed a major package of energy and oil spill provisions dubbed the CLEAR Act. Why is this good news for preservationists? The legislation contains a provision that would fully fund the Historic Preservation Fund at its entire authorized level of $150 million. Not since its inception in 1976 has the Historic Preservation Fund received full funding to carry out the provisions of the National Historic Preservation Act. In fact, since 2001, appropriations have declined from $94 million to less than $80 million.

What this provision means is that all funds collected from Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas leasing (the source of revenue for the Historic Preservation Fund) would be dedicated to supporting national preservation programs. Now, imagine for just a moment what great preservation work our movement will accomplish with full funding of $150 million. I’m normally not an exclamation mark kind of a guy, but wow!

Check out the rest of the article…….

Historic Homes and a Certificate of Appropriateness – Do You Need One?

Soo you’ve just purchased that historic home in Wake Forest NC that you have always dreamed about or maybe you already own a historic home in Wake Forest NC – either way, a Certificate of Appropriateness (COA) is something that you should be familiar with.

What is a Certificate of Appropriateness?  A Certificate of Appropriateness is a permit that allows you physically alter exterior surfaces and areas within a Historic District.  A COA will most likely be issued when it has been determined that the proposed improvements conform with the overall historic character of the District.  You must obtain a COA PRIOR TO any work beginning.  A COA will have specific quidelines set forth to determine how the work will be done as well as set parameters to operate within. 

For instance,  you want to paint your white historic home in Wake Forest NC a different color that perhaps you think will evoke a more Victorian “feel”.  Before you can do so you must apply for and receive a Certificate of Appropriateness.  Should you want to paint your home the SAME color then you would not need a COA.  (Always better to be safe though and call your local Historic Preservation Committee)

Some additional examples of what MAY not need a COA are:

  • Interior renovations or remodels that do not affect the exterior of the home.
  • Planting of shrubs, flower, trees

What is most important though are the types of work that DO need a Certificate of Appropriateness.  Here are a few examples:

  • Moving of a structure
  • Demolition of a structure
  • Conversion to handicap accessible
  • Fences, pools, tennis courts
  • ANY change to the roof line of the structure
  • any addition of an outlying building such as a shed or garage

Keep in mind that even if the scope of your future project does not entail a Building Permit you still need a Certificate of Appropriateness.

Again, for any specific questions regarding your City or Town it would be best to contact your Historic Preservation Committee.

While purchasing and owning a historic home is a wonderful achievement and a life long dream for many – it is best to remember that historic homeownership can be drastically different from that of non-historic homeownership.  Due to the delicate nature of these properties and their significant contribution to history they have to be handled with care which is why there are so many safeguards in place to ensure that they continue their legacy.

If you are currently searching for historic homes in Wake Forest NC please let me know!  There are quite a few currently listed and I would be happy to share their history with you.  You can reach me at 919.649.6128 or simply send me an email!  To discover more that Wake Forest NC has to offer you can visit:

Life in Wake Forest NC

Discover Wake Forest NC

Wake Forest House Chick

 

Seven Sisters Inn Petition

Seven Sisters Inn

Seven Sisters Inn

I wanted to share a story that I just came across from Ocala.com

The Seven Sisters Inn is a historic home on the National Historic Register c. 1888.  It has been voted “Inn of the Month” by Country Inns Bed and Breakfast as well as the “Best Restoration Project”.

This Inn has been up for sale and faces foreclosure if not sold by April 7, 2009.  Ghost Hunters (T.A.P.S.) has featured the inn on it’s program for paranormal activity and it seems as though that appearance has garnered interest from other paranormal research groups around the country.  As a result, a petition has been created to help save the inn.  Please visit Save The Seven Sisters Inn to view the petition and see how you can help!

Hampton Hotels – Save A Landmark Program! – NC Has Some Very Notable Entries!

Wow – What a really cool program!  Hampton Hotels has pioneered a program by which they intend to “save” a landmark property in all 50 states!  Since April 2000, volunteers have refurbished 30 landmarks.  You can preview them here

Their goal is an honorable one!  They want to restore landmark properties throughout the US that honor the achievements of historical legends.  Thus fa,r a few of the notable are Dr. Martin Luther King, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Amelia Earhart and P.T. Barnum.  One of their last for the year will be Edgar Allan Poe.

Three properties in the Raleigh area are nominated and here they are:

The Coolmoor Plantation

The Coolmore Plantation is one of the most treasured gems in the American South.   The 1858 plantation house is treasured for its visionary Italianate design, decorative furnishings and the wealth of documentation on the operation of the plantation.

 

  

The Joel Lane House

Known as “The Father of Raleigh,” Joel Lane built his home in the early 1770’s in what was a very rural part of North Carolina. Lane facilitated the location of North Carolina ‘s capital city on his land, directly contributing to the creation of America ‘s Great South.

 

Old City Jail in Mulberry

In the heart of Andy Griffith’s hometown, Mount Airy, sits the re-creation of “The Courthouse” seen for decades on the popular television series, The Andy Griffith Show . Once the town’s real jail, Old City Jail is surrounded by the recreations of Mayberry’s favorites.

 

If you would like to vote you can visit their website!  They will announce on December 5 the landmark chosen for 2009.  If you know of a property that is not on their list in your area and you would like to nominate it you can visit the link here.