Considering a Historic Home in Wake Forest NC? Become Familiar With a COA!

So you’ve just purchased that historic home in Wake Forest NC that you have always dreamed about or maybe you already own a historic home in Wake Forest NC – either way, a Certificate of Appropriateness (COA) is something that you should be familiar with.

What is a Certificate of Appropriateness?  A Certificate of Appropriateness is a permit that allows you physically alter exterior surfaces and areas within a Historic District.  A COA will most likely be issued when it has been determined that the proposed improvements conform with the overall historic character of the District.  You must obtain a COA PRIOR TO any work beginning.  A COA will have specific quidelines set forth to determine how the work will be done as well as set parameters to operate within.

For instance,  you want to paint your white historic home in Wake Forest NC a different color that perhaps you think will evoke a more Victorian “feel”.  Before you can do so you must apply for and receive a Certificate of Appropriateness.  Should you want to paint your home the SAME color then you would not need a COA.  (Always better to be safe though and call your local Historic Preservation Committee)

Some additional examples of what MAY not need a COA are:

  • Interior renovations or remodels that do not affect the exterior of the home.
  • Planting of shrubs, flower, trees

What is most important though are the types of work that DO need a Certificate of Appropriateness.  Here are a few examples:

  • Moving of a structure
  • Demolition of a structure
  • Conversion to handicap accessible
  • Fences, pools, tennis courts
  • ANY change to the roof line of the structure
  • any addition of an outlying building such as a shed or garage

Keep in mind that even if the scope of your future project does not entail a Building Permit you still need a Certificate of Appropriateness.

Again, for any specific questions regarding your City or Town it would be best to contact your Historic Preservation Committee.

While purchasing and owning a historic home is a wonderful achievement and a life long dream for many – it is best to remember that historic homeownership can be drastically different from that of non-historic homeownership.  Due to the delicate nature of these properties and their significant contribution to history they have to be handled with care which is why there are so many safeguards in place to ensure that they continue their legacy.

If you are currently searching for historic homes in Wake Forest NC please let me know!  There are quite a few currently listed and I would be happy to share their history with you.  You can reach me at 919.649.6128 or simply send me an email!  To discover more that Wake Forest NC has to offer you can visit:

Life in Wake Forest NC

Discover Wake Forest NC

Wake Forest House Chick

 

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Glencoe Mill Village, Burlington NC – Return to a Mill

Amazing piece on the restoration of Glencoe Mill Village in Burlington, NC!  Here is an account from someone that was there when it was ruins and has seen the incredible rebirth!

“Such potential—not to mention the tangible successes at Glencoe—gives hope to the architects of the heritage corridor that other towns will pay similar attention to their own at-risk mill buildings. But it’s not always easy to get people to see the value of what’s right in front of their noses.”

You can read the entire article at National Trust for Historic Preservation – Return To A Mill

Historic Homes and a Certificate of Appropriateness – Do You Need One?

Soo you’ve just purchased that historic home in Wake Forest NC that you have always dreamed about or maybe you already own a historic home in Wake Forest NC – either way, a Certificate of Appropriateness (COA) is something that you should be familiar with.

What is a Certificate of Appropriateness?  A Certificate of Appropriateness is a permit that allows you physically alter exterior surfaces and areas within a Historic District.  A COA will most likely be issued when it has been determined that the proposed improvements conform with the overall historic character of the District.  You must obtain a COA PRIOR TO any work beginning.  A COA will have specific quidelines set forth to determine how the work will be done as well as set parameters to operate within. 

For instance,  you want to paint your white historic home in Wake Forest NC a different color that perhaps you think will evoke a more Victorian “feel”.  Before you can do so you must apply for and receive a Certificate of Appropriateness.  Should you want to paint your home the SAME color then you would not need a COA.  (Always better to be safe though and call your local Historic Preservation Committee)

Some additional examples of what MAY not need a COA are:

  • Interior renovations or remodels that do not affect the exterior of the home.
  • Planting of shrubs, flower, trees

What is most important though are the types of work that DO need a Certificate of Appropriateness.  Here are a few examples:

  • Moving of a structure
  • Demolition of a structure
  • Conversion to handicap accessible
  • Fences, pools, tennis courts
  • ANY change to the roof line of the structure
  • any addition of an outlying building such as a shed or garage

Keep in mind that even if the scope of your future project does not entail a Building Permit you still need a Certificate of Appropriateness.

Again, for any specific questions regarding your City or Town it would be best to contact your Historic Preservation Committee.

While purchasing and owning a historic home is a wonderful achievement and a life long dream for many – it is best to remember that historic homeownership can be drastically different from that of non-historic homeownership.  Due to the delicate nature of these properties and their significant contribution to history they have to be handled with care which is why there are so many safeguards in place to ensure that they continue their legacy.

If you are currently searching for historic homes in Wake Forest NC please let me know!  There are quite a few currently listed and I would be happy to share their history with you.  You can reach me at 919.649.6128 or simply send me an email!  To discover more that Wake Forest NC has to offer you can visit:

Life in Wake Forest NC

Discover Wake Forest NC

Wake Forest House Chick

 

The Chatwal New York Revives Gotham Elegance

1930 Gotham Glamour to be reborn in New York! The Chatwal New York

The restoration of this iconic landmark is being undertaken by world renowned master architect and interior designer Thierry Despont.

A little history of the original building occupants: Established in 1874, The Lambs Club was the gathering place of those who would make Broadway and Hollywood history. Legendary member names include George M. Cohan, W.C. Fields, John Barrymore, Milton Berle, Fred Astaire, Irving Berlin and Will Rogers.

The Chatwal New York Revives Gotham Elegance

Hampton Hotels – Save A Landmark Program! – NC Has Some Very Notable Entries!

Wow – What a really cool program!  Hampton Hotels has pioneered a program by which they intend to “save” a landmark property in all 50 states!  Since April 2000, volunteers have refurbished 30 landmarks.  You can preview them here

Their goal is an honorable one!  They want to restore landmark properties throughout the US that honor the achievements of historical legends.  Thus fa,r a few of the notable are Dr. Martin Luther King, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Amelia Earhart and P.T. Barnum.  One of their last for the year will be Edgar Allan Poe.

Three properties in the Raleigh area are nominated and here they are:

The Coolmoor Plantation

The Coolmore Plantation is one of the most treasured gems in the American South.   The 1858 plantation house is treasured for its visionary Italianate design, decorative furnishings and the wealth of documentation on the operation of the plantation.

 

  

The Joel Lane House

Known as “The Father of Raleigh,” Joel Lane built his home in the early 1770’s in what was a very rural part of North Carolina. Lane facilitated the location of North Carolina ‘s capital city on his land, directly contributing to the creation of America ‘s Great South.

 

Old City Jail in Mulberry

In the heart of Andy Griffith’s hometown, Mount Airy, sits the re-creation of “The Courthouse” seen for decades on the popular television series, The Andy Griffith Show . Once the town’s real jail, Old City Jail is surrounded by the recreations of Mayberry’s favorites.

 

If you would like to vote you can visit their website!  They will announce on December 5 the landmark chosen for 2009.  If you know of a property that is not on their list in your area and you would like to nominate it you can visit the link here.

Hurricanes and Historic Properties

With Hurricane Season in mid-swing there are many properties that are in harms way.  While it is heartbreaking to see historic properties affected by a hurricane it does happen.  I can think first of New Orleans and the surrounding areas when Hurricane Katrina devastated an entire region.  While a catastrophic storm brings a whole set of it’s own issues even a tropical storm can cause damage.  Here are some things to know if your historic property is subjected to a storm.

  • Each SHPO should have a “Damage Report” that can be filled out and sent in.  Some basic questions that you may find on the report are:  Name and location of your property.  Historic District your property is located in.  What kind of damage did the building sustain?  Will all of the damage be covered by your insurance?  If not, how much money do you anticipate having to spend out of pocket?  Can the SHPO be of assistance in assessing the damage and advising you on repairs?
  • Your state specific HPO can provide technical restoration assistance such as vital records regarding your property, guidance in seeking qualified restoration architects and contractors, on-site inspections and free phone consultations. 
  • Your home does NOT have to be on the register (but must be at least 50 years old) however, special consideration will be given to properties that are already on the register.
  • The Office of State Archeology can be invaluable when assistance is needed with exposed once-buried features such as old wells, foundations, privies and cellars.   (Preceeding link is for North Carolina)
  • Emergency Procedures for State Tax Credits following a natural disaster are usually implemented in each state.  In North Carolina there is a 30 day window once an area has been declared as a disaster area in which a historic property owner can receive verbal approval for emergency repairs provided the property qualifies for rehabilitation tax credits.  Be very careful – very detailed information is needed following the verbal approval.  Photographs of damage and detailed damage information is a MUST!

While I sincerely hope that your historic property is NEVER affected by a natural disaster it is always good to be prepared for the aftermath.

If you have any questions or comments please feel free to call me or email me anytime!