Searching For Historic Homes in Wake Forest NC?

Wake Forest NC is rich with history and along with that comes gorgeous architecture that reflects a period in time when homes were showcases and masterpieces.  There is a diverse mixture of architectural styles in historic Wake Forest NC that range from Victorian to Georgian style.  The majority of the historic homes in Wake Forest have been lovingly cared for and kept up to standards with the Historic Guidelines set forth by the Wake Forest NC Historic Commission in conjunction with the N.C. State Historic Preservation Office.

If you are interested in exploring some of the historic homes for sale in Wake Forest NC you can check out a few of the offerings at the end of this post.  Also, for more information on the Historic Guidelines, historic home rehabilitation or Tax Credits that may be available I would like to point you to “What’s YOUR Circa?“.  There you can find a bevy of information to help you decide if a historic home is right for you!  You can easily search for information via the Categories on the right hand side of the blog and, as always, you can certainly email me with any questions that you may have!  Again, that link is What’s YOUR Circa?

In the meantime, here is a quick video with some examples of what you can find by way of historic homes in Wake Forest NC.  Don’t forget to peek below the video for some great historic homes for sale in Wake Forest NC!

 

  • circa 1901: 1350 sf, 3bd/1ba, $55,000.00
  • circa 1910: 1600 sf, 1bd/2.5ba $59,999.00
  • circa 1901: 714 sf, 1bd/1ba $70,000.00
  • circa 1909: 1158 sf, 3bd/1.5ba $113,900.00
  • circa 1901: 3822 sf, 4bd/6ba $225,000.00
  • circa 1840: 3870 sf, 5bd/4ba $275,000.00
  • circa 1920: 2827 sf, 3bd/2ba $397,000.00

House Passes FULL Funding for the Historic Preservation Fund

From Preservation Nation……

On July 30, the House passed a major package of energy and oil spill provisions dubbed the CLEAR Act. Why is this good news for preservationists? The legislation contains a provision that would fully fund the Historic Preservation Fund at its entire authorized level of $150 million. Not since its inception in 1976 has the Historic Preservation Fund received full funding to carry out the provisions of the National Historic Preservation Act. In fact, since 2001, appropriations have declined from $94 million to less than $80 million.

What this provision means is that all funds collected from Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas leasing (the source of revenue for the Historic Preservation Fund) would be dedicated to supporting national preservation programs. Now, imagine for just a moment what great preservation work our movement will accomplish with full funding of $150 million. I’m normally not an exclamation mark kind of a guy, but wow!

Check out the rest of the article…….

Historic Wake Forest NC Local Resources

Wake Forest NC is committed to preserving the historic charm and character that have survived the last century and in doing so offer many resources that are just a click away whether you are a current resident or a newcomer.

If you are interested in Historic Preservation in Wake Forest NC you can certainly keep up with the latest meeting minutes from the Historic Preservation Commission meetings. Meetings are help the second Wednesday of each month and you can find the resulting meeting minutes on their webpage.

In addition to meeting minutes you can find a wealth of information on their site such as:

For more information about Historic Wake Forest NC please feel free to give me a call at 919.649.6128 or simply send me an email! There are a multitude of beautiful historic homes for sale in Wake Forest NC in all price points and sizes!  I would be happy to show you around!  Don’t forget to check out my website, Wake Forest House Chick, for the latest Wake Forest NC real estate news, events and so much more…..


River Mill, Wake Forest NC – Live In History!

1959 River Mill at Neuse Bridge

1959 River Mill at Neuse Bridge

River Mill is one of the oldest manufacturing mills in North Carolina and has seen many transitions in it’s lifetime which has spanned the decades!  From the first recorded use in 1855 this mill has had many uses including granite mill, powder making factory during the Revolutionary War, paper mill, cotton mill and lastly an incredible restoration in the mid-80s turning the old mill into condos.

This 23 acre site bounded by the Neuse River and Falls Lake is rich in wildlife, tranquility, history and natural beauty.  The backdrop of the dam and falls provides natural beauty beyond compare.  There are three separate buildings that comprise River Mill; The Annex, The Mill and The Woods.  Opportunities are rare to own a condo within these historic buildings.  It would seem the time is here for a select few!

Two units currently available are:

1500 River Mill Drive – Unit 112 – 1020 sq ft / 2bd and 2.5bt.  – circa 1854 – Enclosed patio with koi pond, stone walls, circular staircase and original hardwood floors.  $194,900.00

1500 River Mill Drive – Unit 309 – 1190 sq ft / 3bd and 2bt – circa 1854 –  Granite walls, maple floors, stainless steel appliances, circular staircase and one of the largest units.  $194,900.00

River Mill is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  Just a few of the amenities offered are shared flower and herb gardens, outdoor grills, gazebo, horseshoes, basketball goal, and plenty of parking!

For more information regarding these rare oppotunities within River Mill please feel free to call or email me – I would be delighted to help!

The Brewer-Nelson House – History For Sale!

Every once in a while a great gem becomes available in the Wake Forest Historic District!  Now is one of those times!

The Brewer-Nelson House (c. 1853, c. 1860) is a stunning example of the incredible architecture blend that you can find in Wake Forest.  John M. Brewer built a log cabin on this site in about 1853.  In about 1860, it was enlarged and the log section was converted to a basement as part of the “English Basement” of the 1 1/2 story Greek Revival fame homes.  The design was based on a house in Suffolk, VA.  It is the only example of this style of southern architecture on the street.

The Brewer-Nelson House

The Brewer-Nelson House

 

This stunning home offers original heart of pine floors, multiple fireplaces, 4 bedrooms and an office.  Carriage house could easily become an artist studio!  This home is located in the heart of the Historic District and is nestled among magnificent large oaks.  This home is in pristine condition and ready to move into!

Opportunities such as this present themselves rarely!  If you would like more information concerning the Brewer-Nelson home or any others available please feel free to give me a call or email – I would be happy to help!

Historic Home Restoration and Rehabilitation – Part IV

Historic rehabilitation is a subject that I promised to touch on and I am excited to provide you with some avenues for research.  This is quite a complex area and I will do my best to highlight the important points and suggest additional resources as we go along.

I hope that you have enjoyed my previous posts regarding historic homes and that you continue to find this information relevant in your quest for a historic property.  If you missed any of my previous posts here they are:

“Rehabilitation” is defined as “the process of returning a property to a state of utility, through repair or alteration, which makes possible an efficient contemporary use while preserving those portions and features of the property which are significant to its historic, architectural, and cultural values.”  ~  from The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation

The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards of Rehabilitation is the MOST comprehensive resource I have yet to find for guidelines when rehabilitating a property.  The guidelines are broken down into several categories:

  • Masonry, Wood, Metals
  • Roofs, Windows, Entrances/Porches, Storefronts
  • Structural Systems, Spaces/Features/Finishes, Mechanical Systems
  • Site, Setting
  • Energy, New Additions, Accessibility, Health/Safety

and lastly, Standard Guidelines which will be the focus of this post.

The Four Key Components to the Standard Guidelines are:

  1. Identify, Retain and Preserve:  The form and detailing of those architectural materials and features that are important in defining the historic character.
  2. Protect and Maintain:  Once characteristics are identified the next obvious step would be to protect and maintain what is existing.  It would stand to reason that protection is the first logical step before proceeding with any work on a historic property.  Protecting can be as simple as cleaning gutters, caulking, rust removal, etc.  It is during this phase where much of the present physical condition of a property can be assessed.
  3. Repair:  After physical assessments are complete and steps have been taken to protect the property repair can commence on the property.  This is where the individual sections (mentioned above) of The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards of Rehabilitation come into play.  The sections are extremely detailed for which materials can be used and the extent of the work that can be performed.
  4. Replace:  Only when the level of deterioration or damage of materials precludes repair can complete replacement be considered. (for example, an exterior cornice; an interior staircase; or a complete porch or storefront).

Whether you are contemplating a historic property rehabilitation project, starting one or in the middle of one The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards of Rehabilitation is one resource that you MUST have. Other resources available and encouraged are:

Be sure to check back soon for the next post in this series that is near and dear to my heart.  With the middle of hurricane season upon us I thought it might be beneficial to give you some resources should your historic property be affected by a natural disaster.

If you have any questions regarding historic homes or are ready to start your search please feel free to email me!  I would be delighted to help.